Share Your Comments!

Adam Pertman and the Adoption Nation Blog

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Privacy and Responsibility:

Email addresses are required to comment, but they are not published on the blog nor shared; they may be used by the blog owner to privately contact the commenter. By submitting a comment, you agree it is your own and you have sole responsibility for it; you also agree to hold this site, Adam Pertman, and all subsidiaries and representatives harmless from any/all repercussions, damages or liability.
 

10 thoughts on “Share Your Comments!

  1. colleen

    Thank you Adam for your upcoming blog and all the work you do promoting fairness in adoption. I have seen firsthand the devastation that occurs when adoptive parents fail to follow through on pre placement promises and agencies refuse to hold them accountable because “they have the right to do whatever they please once placement is complete and there are no laws to enforce any agreements.” Just because one has the right not to adhere to agreements does not make it the right thing to do. I look forward to the day when the adoption laws in America are fair for birth families as well as adoptive families and adopted persons.
    I enjoyed the previous printing of Adoption Nation and look forward to the update. Thank you again for all the work you do.

    Reply
  2. jane hall

    Education for adoptive families is a must. It should take place before the adoption journey begins. Our agency requires 12 hours of intensive training which includes a birth mother panel, an adoptive parent panel and a curriculum that truly educates prospective parents about openness. The result is amazing. Being an adopted person who was in a closed situation made me realize my loss during the time I had no contact with my birth mother and my siblings. Not every birth parent wants continued contact but it should be encouraged. It is in every adopted child’s best interest to know the truth of his/her adoption story. That kind of truth only surfaces when there is appropriate openness in the adoption.

    Thanks for providing a forum for comments about open adoption.

    Reply
  3. Bill Betzen

    Adam, it is a joy seeing you start a blog. I’ve been writing you for years and have always left the http://www.openadoption.org URL. Now it is http://www.studentmotivation.org – but using the same critical nature of personal history as the driving force.

    What you and I are doing is much bigger than adoption. Everyone needs their history.

    After teaching a few years in a Dallas inner-city middle school it hit me that children of poverty in our chaotic urban settings too often live without major parts of their personal history. It is often denied them by relocation, divorce, conflicts, or by poverty and the struggle parents endure to provide, never being able to share what little they themselves know of their own history. Thus we have graduation rates of 34% in our high schools. Students see no connection to their own past or future, thus there is no long term planning for that future.

    In 2005 we started that 10-year time-capsule, 10-year class reunion/mentoring project that I’ve told you of. Now it starts off with a letter to the child from their parents about their parental dreams for their child.

    The targeted high school since 2005 had a 34% graduation rate from 2000 to 2007 when our first “School Archive Project” middle school students were sophomores. The graduation numbers started to improve. By the Class of 2010 we had a graduation rate of 60%. Many other positive factor also contributed to this success, but I am certain these new connections and planning forward over time were critical.

    Sadly not knowing critical parts of your own history is very common in our culture. It goes far beyond our adoption community. Hopefully we can all learn this critical lesson about human existence. I hope your blog will move us in that direction.

    What a great way to kick off 2011! Happy New Year Adam.

    Reply
  4. Jennifer Yurfest

    Just read about the “practice babies”.
    I hope this story gets wide coverage and attention. Thanks for bringing this to light.
    We need to know everything about this.

    Reply
  5. CullyRay

    I agree with Jane and love the idea of the panels – would’ve “adored” it if there could also be an Adoptee panel included. A panel that includes teens from Open adoptions and Adults from open, closed, and donor-birth. I know that’s asking for the Moon but, as they say, “Go big or go home.” Not every AP is going to choose Open adoption but All APs should know three important things: Honesty is the best policy; “others” may (probably will) say things about being adopted that will affect your child – keep the door of communication open and Listen; and, when their child searches it does not mean the child wants to replace them.
    Open Adoption is the only kind of Adoption there should be… thank you for helping make it so!

    Reply
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